'Me Too' Movement Sharply Divides Korea

中央日報

The "Me Too" movement that swept Hollywood and other celebrity hubs has divided Korea, where every day seems to bring new assertions of fierce girl power in the traditionally patriarchal society.

On the feminist website Womad on Wednesday, a post promised hidden camera shots of men on the toilet -- a dig at the thousands of similar clips of women on offer on porn sites.

Under a picture of a man in a T-shirt sitting on the toilet, the poster wrote, "I took this hidden camera photo in the men's restroom at Korea University. I can post six photos and nine video clips showing male genitalia."

Some 20 hidden-camera clips of naked men are already available on the website, which only allows women to subscribe. All this comes after a woman was arrested on charges of leaking photographs of a nude male model from an art class at Hongik University.

The battle is heating up, with more and more women setting up websites with hidden-camera footage of men, accusing them of being "potential rapists or molesters." 

It seems to be a backlash against a backlash in Korea's notoriously aggressive society. Many traditionally minded men feel emancipation has gone too far, and more and more are venting their fury online and even taking it out with assaults on women in real life.

Ahn Yi-hwan, who heads a gender equality research center, said, "People's anger management problems are spilling over into hostility toward the opposite sex, and expressions of these emotions are getting worse."

Police have launched an investigation into the hidden-camera posts. 

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